28 7 / 2014

jenisicecreams:

New scoop shop decor by Jeni’s Splendid Art + Design Team. Read about it here

Now here is a company that should really consider opening a Paris location. Pretty pretty please with cherries kickapoo on top?

28 7 / 2014

27 7 / 2014

Spicy crab at our super secret neighborhood resto last night.

Spicy crab at our super secret neighborhood resto last night.

26 7 / 2014

bbook:

Bonjour, Beach Babes: 10 Great Swimsuits From 10 Great French Films 

You won’t catch me in bathing suit anytime soon, but should you need some inspiration of the French variety, here you go!

25 7 / 2014

jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’

No additional commentary required.

(via huffingtonpost)

24 7 / 2014

food52:

You deserve better than bottled dressing.

Read more: The Most Important Jar in Your Office Fridge on Food52

A few days ago I mentioned that panzanella salad was one of a few dishes that I could make successfully without a recipe. Well I would now like to add une vinaigrette to that teeny tiny but slowly expanding list. Some of you may know that bottled salad dressing is not common in France (I’m not sure they even carry it at any of my local grocery stores) and I haven’t had the prefabricated stuff in years. This is because every good French person learns, practically at birth, how to make a simple vinaigrette and therefore it was the first “recipe” I decided to master upon moving to Paris (I knew that I had succeeded when DD genuinely complimented me on a simple side salad about a year after we moved in together). So without much further ado, here are my instructions for making a classic French vinaigrette:

Place 1/2 tsp. of Dijon mustard in a bowl. Add 1-2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar, depending on how strong you like it, and whisk together. Add salt and pepper. Whisk again. Slowly add 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil while whisking furiously.

This is the basic vinaigrette, however I usually add parsley and shallots at the end. You can use different types of mustard (i.e. moutarde à l’ancienne) and/or vinegar to change it up (though I wouldn’t make a balsamic vinegar dressing in this way). Also, the French usually make the dressing first and then add the lettuce and other salad ingredients on top before tossing it all together (gently).

Et voilà. I do believe this is the first time I’ve ever shared a “recipe” with you all. Enjoy and bon appetit !

23 7 / 2014

French supermarket chain Intermarché launched this promotional campaign to help reduce food waste from “undesirable” fruits and vegetables. Rather than throw out ugly, deformed, or damaged produce, Intermarché instead sells them with a unique twist.

This is a great idea and I love the French humor involved in the promotional campaign, but in my experience with Intermarché they’ve always had le plus moche (the ugliest) fruits and vegetables of all the grocery stores in our neighborhood. DD and I almost never purchase fresh produce from Intermarché because it’s often spoiled or wilted or just plain gross-looking. Anyways, good luck with that and maybe I’ll give their “inglorious” soup a try come Fall.

BTW the video is in English, so go ahead and watch.

(Source: wimp.com, via wallofdis)

22 7 / 2014

mimbeau:

Cor Van Weele
Pont des Arts - Paris 1954

So this is what it looks like without the love locks.

mimbeau:

Cor Van Weele

Pont des Arts - Paris 1954

So this is what it looks like without the love locks.

21 7 / 2014

So much love for la dune du Pilat.

So much love for la dune du Pilat.

(Source: carolinedemaigret)

20 7 / 2014

food52:

Bread salad. Who can say no?

Read more: How to Make Panzanella Without a Recipe on Food52.

Not me!

PS This is one of a handful of dishes that I can make successfully without a recipe.

PPS It’s the perfect thing to make with leftover baguette.

PPPS I have to go make one right now.