10 8 / 2014

theparisreview:

“It is a grave error to assume that ice cream consumption requires hot weather.” —Anne Fadiman, born today in 1953

Preach. 
This is especially relevant since the hot weather seems to have left Paris.

theparisreview:

“It is a grave error to assume that ice cream consumption requires hot weather.” —Anne Fadiman, born today in 1953

Preach.

This is especially relevant since the hot weather seems to have left Paris.

09 8 / 2014

huffposttaste:

You know it’s true, so you might as well embrace it: The French are just better at life.

More often than not, these lists are kind of lame. But this one is all about French food and I can’t seem to find fault with it.

(via huffingtonpost)

07 8 / 2014

Mmmm carnitas!

Mmmm carnitas!

07 8 / 2014

Lunch at Cantine California with this lovely lady today.

Lunch at Cantine California with this lovely lady today.

07 8 / 2014

food52:

A savory summer tart with a hint of sweet and spicy.

Savory Goat Cheese Tart with Roasted Heirloom Tomatoes & Jalapeño Honey Drizzle on Cooking with Cakes

This may be the most perfect thing ever.

28 7 / 2014

27 7 / 2014

Spicy crab at our super secret neighborhood resto last night.

Spicy crab at our super secret neighborhood resto last night.

24 7 / 2014

food52:

You deserve better than bottled dressing.

Read more: The Most Important Jar in Your Office Fridge on Food52

A few days ago I mentioned that panzanella salad was one of a few dishes that I could make successfully without a recipe. Well I would now like to add une vinaigrette to that teeny tiny but slowly expanding list. Some of you may know that bottled salad dressing is not common in France (I’m not sure they even carry it at any of my local grocery stores) and I haven’t had the prefabricated stuff in years. This is because every good French person learns, practically at birth, how to make a simple vinaigrette and therefore it was the first “recipe” I decided to master upon moving to Paris (I knew that I had succeeded when DD genuinely complimented me on a simple side salad about a year after we moved in together). So without much further ado, here are my instructions for making a classic French vinaigrette:

Place 1/2 tsp. of Dijon mustard in a bowl. Add 1-2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar, depending on how strong you like it, and whisk together. Add salt and pepper. Whisk again. Slowly add 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil while whisking furiously.

This is the basic vinaigrette, however I usually add parsley and shallots at the end. You can use different types of mustard (i.e. moutarde à l’ancienne) and/or vinegar to change it up (though I wouldn’t make a balsamic vinegar dressing in this way). Also, the French usually make the dressing first and then add the lettuce and other salad ingredients on top before tossing it all together (gently).

Et voilà. I do believe this is the first time I’ve ever shared a “recipe” with you all. Enjoy and bon appetit !

23 7 / 2014

French supermarket chain Intermarché launched this promotional campaign to help reduce food waste from “undesirable” fruits and vegetables. Rather than throw out ugly, deformed, or damaged produce, Intermarché instead sells them with a unique twist.

This is a great idea and I love the French humor involved in the promotional campaign, but in my experience with Intermarché they’ve always had le plus moche (the ugliest) fruits and vegetables of all the grocery stores in our neighborhood. DD and I almost never purchase fresh produce from Intermarché because it’s often spoiled or wilted or just plain gross-looking. Anyways, good luck with that and maybe I’ll give their “inglorious” soup a try come Fall.

BTW the video is in English, so go ahead and watch.

(Source: wimp.com, via wallofdis)

20 7 / 2014

food52:

Bread salad. Who can say no?

Read more: How to Make Panzanella Without a Recipe on Food52.

Not me!

PS This is one of a handful of dishes that I can make successfully without a recipe.

PPS It’s the perfect thing to make with leftover baguette.

PPPS I have to go make one right now.